Installing Angle Parking In The Astoria Neighborhood

Installing Angle Parking In The Astoria Neighborhood

As per OANA’s request, the Transportation Division of DCP looked into the feasibility of installing angle parking in the Astoria neighborhood. Our analysis focused on the six streets that are identified as potential sites by OANA. We assessed if those streets are good candidates for angle parking implementation and if so, how many parking spaces will be gained from the change.

In our analysis, 60-degree reverse parking is tested as it is the most commonly found angle parking design in the city. The diagram below illustrates the design standards of the 60-degree reverse parking and parallel parking. As it reveals, compared to parallel parking, angle parking usually provides more parking spaces but has higher requirement of street widths. Therefore, the street width is a key consideration in our analysis, as well as road configuration, traffic volumes, truck activities, etc.

angle_parkingThe analysis result shows that the two streets below are good candidates for angle parking implementation.

  • Hoyt Ave South from 21st St eastbound;
  • 14th St between 30th Ave and Broadway.

We had also initially considered 36th Avenue from 21st Street to Vernon Boulevard a good candidate for angled parking but have ruled it out due to traffic and safety concerns.

In total, conversion on those streets can bring approximately 100 additional parking spaces.
However, we do not suggest angled parking on the other three streets out of a variety of considerations. Top reasons include insufficient road space for angle parking or huge change in road configuration without gaining a significant number of parking spaces, etc.

Below is the analysis results for each individual site.

1. Hoyt Ave South from 21st St. eastbound

This street has wide lanes and buffers, which provides sufficient space for angle parking.
If the parallel parking lane on the north is converted to angle parking, additional 45 spaces can be added.

hoyt_ave

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2. Hoyt Ave North from 21st St. and 19th St

Installing angled parking is not suggested on the street segment.

  • As there is a left turn bay when EB Hoyt Ave North approaches 21st St, only part of this road segment potentially has room for angle parking.
  • Conversion to angle parking will diminish the traffic lane widths to less than 11 feet, which is not acceptable for a truck route.

hoyt3

 

3. Astoria Blvd between Main St and 8th St

Installing angle parking on this street is possible but not recommended.

  • As Astoria Blvd is a local truck route with truck loading activities on the north side, sufficient clearance is required for truck maneuvering.
  • To install angle parking, Astoria Blvd needs to drop one drive lane and both parallel parking lanes to ensure the clearance for truck loading.
  • Conversion to angle parking may add approximately 10 more spaces. However, we think the number is not significant and probably not worth the efforts, considering the huge change in road configuration and the loss of road capacity.

hoyt5

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4. 8th St between 27th Ave and Astoria Blvd
Installing angled parking is not suggested on this street. This road segment doesn’t have enough space for angle parking.

hoyt7

 

5. 14th St between 30th Ave and Broadway

  • 14th St is a one-way street with two drive ways and low to moderate traffic volume.
  • Angle parking could be installed if we drop one travel lane, which will not significantly impact the traffic on this street.
  • Converting parallel parking on the west side of the street to angled parking can bring approximately 47 more spaces.

hoyt9

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6. 36th Ave from 21st St to Vernon Blvd

We had also initially considered 36th Avenue from 21st Street to Vernon Boulevard a good candidate for angled parking but have ruled it out due to traffic and safety concerns.

  • Installing angled parking on the north side of this road segment could add approximately 35 parking spaces.
  • Travel lane widths will be reduced to 11 feet or 10.5 feet at some portion of the street, which is acceptable for a local street.


hoyt11

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We do not think this is a good candidate for angled parking. If you take a look at the streetview image below, you will see that there is considerable school mini-bus activity around the Jackson Development Center at 36th Avenue and 14th Street. Angled parking in this location may exacerbate traffic and safety issues in this vicinity.

hoyt13

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